Kent Park Arboretum

# 4482

# 4482

I spent a couple of pleasant hours at the Arboretum in Webster (Where Life is Worth Living).  It’s definitely Spring, which is to say cold and wet, in this part of the country.  But warmer weather is not far out of reach and the signs are all around us.  It’s a great time to get the camera out and also it’s very uplifting for the spirit, too.

Also, there are two photos that benefited from the newest version of Topaz Black and White Effects 2.1, making an outstanding plug-in even better.  Best part: Topaz offers free upgrades for life on all their products.  This is not a paid endorsement.

# 4459

# 4459

# 4454

# 4454

# 4476

# 4476

# 4476-2

# 4476-2

# 4478

# 4478

# 4500

# 4500

#4506

#4506

# 4507

# 4507

PS: Regarding the photo of the house in the last post, I found this photo taken on January 3, 2012 that has the same house in the background.  It had the mural painted on  at that time and I’m sure that it had been painted at least months before, since no one paints the outside of a house in the Winter months.  I mention it only in passing because I was trying to remember when I first saw the painting on it but this is the only clue I could come up with.  The file has only basic LR4 edits so please forgive me this one time.

# 6328 2012 01 03

# 6328 2012 01 03

Advertisements

17 thoughts on “Kent Park Arboretum

  1. Linda Grashoff

    Nice use of your time, Ken. I can see why you included both the color and B&W versions of some of these. I especially can’t choose between #4506 and #4507: both beauties.

    Reply
    1. oneowner Post author

      Thanks, Linda. I have set up a preset in the Topaz plug-in to keep the consistency within the series. It’s easy to do and easily customized.

      Reply
  2. LensScaper

    That was a good shoot, Ken. I’m still waiting to get my first proper shoot of Spring. Might manage it this weekend – we have sun, but with it will come lower temperatures and wind. Chilly!

    Reply
      1. oneowner Post author

        Exactly. I used this technique for portraits and used the adjustment brush to bring back sharpness and clarity to the eyes and mouth. It’s very easy and controllable.The adjustment brush is also used for a light tint to the skin tone (sometimes color balance can do this,too) and adding highlight to hair.

      2. ehpem

        I like that one the best too. Good workflow tips in the comments here too. I have been going about that the opposite way – using the adjustment brush over big areas and softening the clarity. Your way makes more sense, and probably uses less memory as well when it comes to exporting or printing.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s