blackdog side door

# 5473

# 5473

Rochester is an old city with some old alleys.  This one has a building with beautiful red brick and an inviting bench.  I tried converting this to black and white but it lost some of the impact without the color so I decided not to post it.  Since these alleys are narrow it’s good to bring a wide angle lens and I wish I had one just a bit wider for a straight on shot like this.

# 5476

# 5476

These benches have been known to walk away so they need to be chained to the wall behind.

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12 thoughts on “blackdog side door

  1. ehpem

    I like the colours in this one, though I bet it was pretty nice in black and white too.

    Why is it that old brick walls always have in-filled door or window openings? Is it true of all buildings but we normally can’t see them as the scars can be more effectively covered up?

    Reply
    1. oneowner Post author

      Thanks, ehpem. One of the things I like about the color is that it keep a texture in the brick that didn’t show as well in the black and white. Perhaps I need to bump the contrast a bit to get it so I’ll probably revisit it again.
      I think these old buildings get new owners and tenants frequently and they need to have a modern floor plan to suit them. Those old windows are expensive to replace too. Since this is a recording studio, they really don’t need any windows.

      Reply
  2. Anita Jesse

    I enjoy the arrangement of the variety of blocks in varying tones perfectly set off by the fire hydrant. The hydrant feels like a punctuation mark and deliciously set on the “wrong” side of the page for a western reader. A pleasure on so many levels with the terrific textures and shapes.

    Reply
  3. LensScaper

    They matched up the bricks well when they removed the upstairs windows, didn’t they! I love the feel of ‘nothing matches’ about this shot. It continually asks questions to which the viewer has not answers.

    Reply
    1. oneowner Post author

      Thanks, Andy. I think the original brick is about 80 years older that the brick used to replace the windows. I’ll have to come back in 80 years to see if it’s blended in better.

      Reply
    1. oneowner Post author

      Thanks, Charles. There is just so much photographic appeal to these old buildings for me, more so than some of the newer building that seem to lack character.

      Reply

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