double exposure

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There was a time when it was very easy to make double exposures in camera.  Camera manufactures thought that was a problem for the average consumer and started to design fail safes to prevent them from happening.  There was usually a way on the more sophisticated cameras to get a multiple exposure on a single frame but it became obvious it was becoming increasingly difficult to do.  It’s pretty much impossible to do in a digital camera but software allows us to do as many multiple exposures with greater control very easily.  On this shot (shots?), I wanted to get the wire reinforcement grid on the window in focus as well as the background but I could not get enough depth of field in the camera.  I shot two images, one with the foreground in focus and one with the background in focus and combined them.  The technique is very easy and simple but a key requirement to do this successfully is to try to pre-visualize the effect you want before taking the photos.  I think it just makes it easier to process later.

Here is another shot through a different window but with a similar grid and only one exposure:

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If you still want another grid photo, go to the sister site here!!!

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31 thoughts on “double exposure

    1. oneowner Post author

      Thanks, Alessandro. There are many different effects you can achieve depending on the blend mode you choose for the second image.

      Reply
    1. oneowner Post author

      Thanks, Melinda. I don’t get to this location very often and it’s hard to find windows with the wire reinforcement anymore but I had the idea to do this months ago and last week I finally had the opportunity. Now I don’t know when I’ll be back again.

      Reply
  1. John - Visual Notebook

    I definitely like the first one. I took a bunch of focus-stacked shots of dried flowers the other day and plan to post one or two sometime in the near future. I believe my D7000 has a “multiple exposure” option built in. Wouldn’t know where to look for it though!

    Reply
    1. ken bello

      Thanks, John. You will have more control over the multiple exposures in post processing than in camera I would think. Ant there is more of the fun factor, too!

      Reply
    1. oneowner Post author

      Thanks, Linda. You have a lot of control making these in post processing than you would the old way of trying to do it in camera and it was a fun exercise.

      Reply
  2. Anita Jesse

    These are wonderful. It is interesting how many prople loathe photo processing. I find it extremely challenging and rewarding. I love what you accomplished. I like all three.

    Reply
    1. oneowner Post author

      Thanks, Anita. I not only find processing challenging and rewarding but relaxing, too. I never feel pressured and I think it’s enjoyable work.

      Reply
      1. Anita Jesse

        You are so right—I left out relaxing. If I tense up during processing, I know that I have let the paralysis of expectation creep in. Time to take a deep breath and enjoy the process.

  3. ehpem

    This is interesting to see at work. I have been itching to do double exposures, but don’t have the software that allows this kind of thing – but I seem to be getting closer and closer to buying some, and learning it.
    It looks as if the OS software that one can get to run on cameras, like Magic Lantern, don’t do double exposures in camera either.

    Reply
    1. oneowner Post author

      Thanks, ehpem. I think any software that permits layers and blend modes would work just as well as Photoshop, even Elements or ACDSee Pro which sell for a fraction of the price of PS, although I understand you can not buy Photoshop anymore, only rent it. I’ve used Elements v5 up until 3 years ago and it was a great program. I think they are up to v10 now so I’m sure there have been a lot of advances.

      Reply
  4. Charles Ford

    I never would have thought of this. Another idea to steal!

    My grandfather was apparently famous in the family for accidentally double exposing on his old Argus camera. Pretty easy to do when you have to manually wind the film to the next empty frame.

    I love these.

    Reply
    1. oneowner Post author

      Thanks, Charles. My father had a Foth Derby that had a separate film advance and shutter cocking lever. A great camera for multiple exposures but poor in almost every other respects.

      Reply
  5. LensScaper

    As others have commented – odd the way the tone of the grid is reversed. I like both shots not least for the subtle colours that add a little extra frisson to them.

    Reply
    1. oneowner Post author

      Thanks, Andy. I like the lighter grid lines on these. I think the grid is a stainless steel mesh and not black at all and they show up a light color when out of focus because they are reflecting the light that falls on them. Maybe!

      Reply
  6. Paul

    Though it is pretty easy to do digitally, that’s something that I rarely do. I remember that I had a button on my Minolta XD-11, just for that. I would allow you to cock the shutter without advancing the film – I rarely used it then, too.

    Reply
    1. oneowner Post author

      I remember the XD-11. That was a pretty advanced camera. Made me want to switch from Nikon to Minolta. Minolta had great cutting edge technology, much like Sony now.

      Reply

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